Living Life without Fear of Death Part One

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Finite Creatures.”

Today’s Blogging 101 assignment is to use a writing prompt as a starting point for a blog post. I chose this one from a few months ago, which asked “At what age did you realize you were not immortal? How did you react to that discovery?”

In reference to my physical body, I don’t believe I ever thought of it as immortal. My father died when when I was a toddler, just a few weeks after my younger brother’s birth, so death seemed as real as life–something that happens to everyone. I have a picture I drew in kindergarten of my family, and included with the stick figures labeled “Mommy” “Van” and “Laurie” is “Daddy,” the father I didn’t remember as a physical presence in my life. According to my aunt, when my mother saw the picture, she gently reminded me that I didn’t have a daddy, but I said, “Yes I do, my daddy is in heaven.” We visited his grave occasionally, and I grew up with a love of old cemeteries. They don’t seem morbid or scary to me, I suppose because I associate them with memories of my mother and the conversations we had about my father. She didn’t spend those visits crying, but instead shared stories so we would have some connection to him. To be continued….

I took this photo a few years ago in a cemetery in Fairhope, Alabama, just a few weeks after Mardi Gras. I call it “Laissez les bons temps rouler!”

The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time. Mark Twain

The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time. ~Mark Twain

3 thoughts on “Living Life without Fear of Death Part One

  1. Your blog was insightful. I’ve found that as I’ve gotten older, my view on death has changed. When I was younger, I was so afraid of death. But now, it’s not death that I’m afraid of. It’s how my kids will remember me. I don’t spend nearly as much time with them as I should. I find myself making excuses that I have to work hard to possibly get the next promotion so they can have the things they want, so that they’ll be set up for their future. The balance can be skewed.

    • Ron, I’d bet that as long as your children’s basic needs are met, time spent with their dad means a lot more than things. So often I hear adults talk about how much they always hungered for their father’s time, attention and approval. You probably know the Harry Chapin song, “The Cat’s in the Cradle” which has a great message for parents. Don’t wait until it’s too late, please!

  2. Pingback: For All the Saints: Living Life without Fear of Death Part Two | ShiningThrough

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